Notes from a Makeup Artist: The Light Touch

Notes from a Makeup Artist: The Light Touch

 

Miriam Robstad has applied makeup for celebrities and models who appear in the pages of top fashion magazines like Vogue and Elle. So she speaks from experience when she confirms the number-one mistake women make when making up a maturing face: “Some women seem to think that more makeup will make them look younger,” she notes, adding that the opposite tends to be true.

 

Instead, Robstad recommends covering only what absolutely needs it, like bags and dark circles under the eyes, and aiming for a natural look—not a noticeable one—when filling in brows. From there, the key is to use light to one’s advantage, starting with basic skin care: “Moisturize! Mature skin can still be glowing if you use the right products,” she emphasizes.

 

From there, makeup should be used to manipulate light to highlight some angles while playing down others. Robstad swears by cult favorite product Touch Eclat by Yves Saint Laurent, a secret weapon. “You want to conceal and brighten the areas that get darker with age, especially around the eyes,” she adds.

 

Makeup is a fun way to conceal and cover the skin. However, when we take care of the skin, less concealer and cover is needed and makeup becomes more about enhancing and fun rather than conceal and cover. In the office, we can do minimally-invasive treatments to improve the area under the eyes at the cellular level. Microneedling with radiofrequency (Vivace platform) improves fine lines and wrinkles and tones, smooths and brightens the skin. Tear trough or under-eye filler (my favorite is Restylane for this area) can also be used to smooth the transition between the lower eyelid and cheek and fill in the hollows. By putting filler into the cheek and then blending the lid/cheek junction, the midface and eyes look more youthful. 



Author
Kaete Archer, MD Facial Plastic Surgeon

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