Your most popular questions about Brow Lifts

Your top 10 most popular questions from RealSelf.com about Brow Lifts answered by Dr. Archer! If you have your own specific questions about Brow Lifts, please contact us via social (IG @archerfacialplastics, Twitter @ArcherMD, Facebook Kaete Archer, MD) or email drarcher@archerfacialplastics.com. Thank you! 

  1. Options To Treat Asymmetric Uneven Eyebrows and Sometimes Eyelid?

Q: “Hi, I am wondering what options I have for my uneven eyebrows. My left eyebrow is a lot higher than my right eyebrow, and when I'm tired my right eyebrow tends to droop even more. The reason why it bothers me is because it completely changes my facial expressions. I have tried stimulating the muscles, massages, make-up etc but its not helping. Thank u in advance!”

A: For uneven brows, there are surgical and non-surgical options.  The best option for you will depend on discussing the underlying causes and your goals with your surgeon.  A Botox treatment works to relax the muscle across the forehead (frontalis) and the muscles between the eyebrows and around the eyes.  A well planned Botox treatment can lower or raise the eyebrows slightly.  An asymmetric Botox treatment may help to even them out.  The other option is a browlift.  A brow lift is a procedure that could be done for both brows or just one brow.  In your case, if the right brow is significantly lower, a right browlift will create more symmetry.  I recommend a consultation with a qualified surgeon to discuss your options.   

 

  1. Can Asymmetric Eyes or Eyebrows Be Fixed? 

Q: “I am interested in fixing my asymmetrical eyes. One of my brows sits noticeably lower and that same eye looks much smaller than the other eye/eyebrow. Is this a problem that can be fixed to create a more balanced, symmetrical set of eyes for myself? I am a young woman in her twenties, not an older person so I am not sure what type of surgery would be best, but I plan on consulting soon. Thank you!”

A: For uneven brows, there are surgical and non-surgical options.  The best option for you will depend on discussing the underlying causes and your goals with your surgeon.  A Botox treatment works to relax the muscle across the forehead (frontalis) and the muscles between the eyebrows and around the eyes.  A well planned Botox treatment can lower or raise the eyebrows slightly.  An asymmetric Botox treatment may help to even them out.  The other option is a browlift.  A brow lift is a procedure that could be done for both brows or just one brow.  In your case, a unilateral browlift may create more symmetry.  I recommend a consultation with a qualified surgeon to discuss your options. 

 

  1. How much does a brow lift cost?

Q: “Generally how much would I need to spend to get a forehead brow lift?”

A: The cost of a brow lift depends on many factors including type of brow lift (endoscopic, temporal, direct, etc), location, and surgeon experience.  I recommend to do some research online for qualified board-certified plastic/facial plastic surgeons in your area and make a consultation appointment.  You will notice that each office offers slightly different pricing options but it will give you the best idea of pricing in your area. 

 

  1. What exactly is the problem with my eye/eyebrow and what can I do to fix it?  

Q: “One of my eyebrows is much higher than the other. It alters my smile and face and leaves me looking weird or disfigured in pictures and in person. It comes out especially when I smile, and the more facial expression I use, the worse it gets. It is noticeable when relaxed and almost feels like one side is constantly raised. I can even raise that sides eyebrow but not the other It makes me EXTREMELY sad and self conscious. Is this fixable and what exactly is the problem?”

A: You mentioned that you can raise the left eyebrow that sits higher but not the right.  This suggest to me that you are having some muscle or nerve weakness to the right brow and that is why it is lower.  Alternatively, you may have a hyperactive forehead muscle (frontalis) that is pulling the left brow up.  If this is the issue, some Botox would relax the muscle and may lower the left brow.  If it is actually a problem with a low right brow, the best option is seeking a consultation with a qualified board-certified plastic/facial plastic surgeon to talk about brow lift options on the right.  Since there is asymmetry, there may always be some asymmetry but I believe it can be improved.  It may be a combination of a conservative right brow lift and some Botox on the left but an in person consultation can help you piece that out. 

 

  1. Non-surgical Ways to Help Sagging Brow Area?

Q: “I'm 48 yrs., with having had minimal sun bathing exposure.. no visible damage to forehead skin, yet I've notice a slight drop of my BROW area. Nature is so CRUEL. I don't deserve this; never drank alcohol. I've had my eye lids cut 4 times, removal of excess skin, (which wasn't really bad); just trying to achieve a more open look to my "deep set" eyes. Hate the thought of brow lift..too INVASIVE. Now I'm understanding that Botox relaxes this area even more, having ADVERSE affect. Too bad no invention to inject into musclse something to STIFFEN / or expand.”

A: Over time, the brows definitely start to descend and if the underlying issue is the brows, no amount of eyelid lift (blepharoplasty) is going to address that.  There are so many factors going on in aging eyes - skin changes, gravity, and volume loss.  It sounds like a brow lift would be a better option for you.  Maybe discuss with your surgeon the need for some fat grafting under the brows and under the eyes as well.  This can be a really nice but subtle improvement to rejuvenate this area in addition to the brow lift.  What you are noticing may be deflation of the fat pads and flattening of the brows rather than excess skin and to address that, you need more volume. 

 

  1. How Long is the Recovery from Brow Lift?

Q: “I am getting a Brow lift in 2 weeks and I am wondering how long the recovery is? How much pain will I be in after the procedure and how safe is it?”

A: Brow lift recovery somewhat depends on the type of brow lift you are getting.  Most brow lifts are done with sutures or metal clips in or behind the hairline that are removed at 1 week.  By 1 week, you are feeling better and looking better but you will have swelling to some degree for months after the procedure.  I routinely offer prescription pain medication for patients after a brow lift but that is usually only needed for a few days and then patients switch to Tylenol.  Brow lifts are safe but every procedure and surgery has risks.  The specifics depend on the type of brow lift so I would make sure you discuss this with your surgeon before the procedure.

 

  1. Mini-brow Lift Vs. Botox: Trying to Save Money 

Q: “would love to cut down my botox cost but i like the results to stick around.  today i saw an article on msnbc that said a doctor (Dr. Gerut) offers a mini-brow lift to get permanent botox like results. Here's what the doctor said: "people have Botox to avoid surgery and here's surgery to avoid Botox but it is effective and it's a heck of a lot cheaper in the long run. It costs about as much as two years of Botox and you never need it again," Do you think a mini brow lift will achieve same results as botox for between the eyebrows? Does every plastic surgeon offer this procedure or is it a special technique?”

A: In my experience, mini-brow lifts equal mini-results.  A complete brow lift will release all of the brow attachments and cut some of the muscles but, even then, some function usually returns requiring Botox.  Botox is extremely effective at paralyzing the muscles across the forehead and around the eyes and my suspicion is that while the mini-brow lift may work temporarily, it will not be as effective as Botox. 

 

  1. What is an Endoscopic Brow Lift? 

Q: “How is an endoscopic browlift different than a traditional brow lift or forehead lift?”

A: An endoscopic brow lift is one of many types of brow lift.  Brow lifts are generally classified by the approach including coronal, temporal/lateral, endoscopic, direct, mid-forehead, and pre/trichial.  Which approach is chosen depends on hairline and anatomy.  A coronal lift or any approach behind the hairline will raise the hairline.  An incision right at the hairline or in front of the hairline (pre/trichial) will not raise the hairline.  

The endoscopic approach includes 4 incisions (some variations amongst surgeons) behind the hairline.  These are small incisions that fit thin endoscopic instruments.  The surgeon is able to visualize the tissues magnified on a high-definition TV screen for precision and accuracy dissecting the tissue.  Because the incisions are shorter than other "open" approaches, this approach may have a faster recovery time and less risk of hair loss.  High hairlines or severely curved foreheads are not good candidates for this approach.  

Which option is best for you will depend on your examination and aesthetic goals.  I recommend a consultation with a qualified surgeon to discuss your options.  

 

  1. How Painful is an Endoscopic Brow Lift?  

Q: What is the pain associated with an endoscopic brow lift? I had a full face lift 7 months ago and I really wish I would have gotten the brow lift as well but I was afraid of doing everything at once, opting to wait and do them seperately. Is is very painful or manageble pain? How long does the discomfort last? I hear the results are immediate... That should help with some of the pain. When I had my facelift, I could jump for joy I was so elated.

A: Brow lift recovery somewhat depends on the type of brow lift you are getting.  Most brow lifts are done with sutures or metal clips in or behind the hairline that are removed at 1 week.  By 1 week, you are feeling better and looking better but you may have swelling to some (small) degree for months after the procedure.  

I routinely offer prescription pain medication for patients after a brow lift but that is usually only needed for a few days and then patients switch to Tylenol.  Patients have a headache for a few days and experience some numbness across the forehead and top of head.  

I recommend that patients avoid strenuous activity, heavy lifting, anything that gets the heart rate or blood pressure up for 2 weeks after the brow lift. 

Brow lifts are safe but every procedure and surgery has risks.  The specifics depend on the type of brow lift so I would make sure you discuss this with your surgeon before the procedure.

 

  1. How is a Temporal Brow Lift Different from Other Lift Methods?

Q: “Why would doctors recommend a temporal brow lift for some patients?”

A: A temporal brow lift is great for patients who only have lateral brow heaviness (the tail or outside part of the brow).  This will not address the inside part of the eyebrow.  If you have heavy lateral brows or excess lateral upper eyelid skin, including a temporal brow lift can improve the overall rejuvenation of the area. 

Author
Kaete Archer, MD Facial Plastic Surgeon

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